Created lopsided

Have you ever noticed that the “come to me” motion (internal rotation at the elbow) is easier than the “you go ahead” motion (external rotation at the elbow)?

I did this morning as I was using my rubber tubing to strengthen the muscles of my rotator cuff. (around the shoulder) Turn sideways, hold the handles to the tubing anchored in the door, lock your elbow at your side and press the back of the hand away from your body like you’re opening a door or a drawer. Why, when my body seems so symmetrically designed, so parallel and balanced, are rotational motions so lop-sided?

Perhaps because the gathering to ourselves happens and will happen over and over again. The gimme. The I’ve got this. The No, I know the way, follow me. We strengthen that over time by using it again and again. But the “Please, you go ahead” need happen only once. Once we give way to follow, we open a door that turns us away from the gimme’s. It’s a simple act of respect.

It would be polite, I guess, to hold the door open for others coming behind. But I’m not sure we’re meant to. Perhaps, if people behind us know us well and respect us enough they’ll be curious about the door we just disappeared behind. Maybe, if they’re close enough, they’ll catch a quick glimpse as we pass through and hurry to investigate.

Perhaps if I close the door carefully and quietly behind me, don’t let it slam, leave it slightly ajar…

But no, close it does. Now I’m hoping my continually strong internal rotators aren’t evidence that I keep trying to pry that door back open to go back to the gimme’s and the follow me’s.

Perhaps if I turn the other way and work on external rotation from both sides, I’ll be balanced.

Aha! God wants me to be ambidextrous!

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About wlebolt

Wendy is a health and fitness professional and coach who specializes in helping young athletes dig deep to reach high. Her business, Fit2Finish, LLC, serves the Washington DC metropolitan area.

Posted on January 28, 2014, in Body, Cool Science, In Action and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. So from pilates perspective….:)
    We train the movement to become more balanced then mindfully apply it in our daily movement. Its hard to be mindful of a movement we haven’t learned to feel from the inside, making it purposeful. ( you do know that my comments are just gut reactions right :)Don’t read too much into this Im not much of a deep thinker)

    • Ah, but you are deep…mover, Susan. And that takes thought 🙂
      Yes, this is a challenge with sports movement. Most folks have never “thought” about what makes a movement, they just move and see if it works out. Kind of an immediate gratification mentality. On the other hand, slow, steady movements do not replicate what’s needed on the field of play. So starting slow – with feeling – and working up to automatic (and well-balanced) speed of play is optimal. Most folks stay in one camp or the other. Tortoise OR the hare.

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