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Resting Place

Work hard, and never let up, so when it comes to you, you deserve it.

It’s the mantra.

It’s the message.

It’s how we raise our children and ignite our workforce and justify promotion and pay.

But Christ says, “No really. I want you to have this.”FullSizeRender (1)

And you look out upon this and it’s what you have always wanted, even though you have never wanted for anything.

Who would turn down a gift like this?

Rest in me, Love.

I have come to prepare a place for you.

Here.FullSizeRender (2)

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Good words inspired by the Good Word

Dear friends,

Two-Champagne-Glasses-624x557As we turn the page to a new year, here are a few sentiments that held special meaning for me from the pages of my copy of the Upper Room devotional booklet. Happy New Year!

“While living the Christian life is difficult – even risky – what it means to be a Christian is actually simple: we are called to love the Lord our God and to love our neighbors as ourselves.”

“God desires to lead us not dominate us.”

“He is with me to show me his wounds and to heal mine.”

“How did you deal with your own feelings about being late?” “I’ve learned to trust God to take care of it on the other end. Now when, through no fault of my own, I’m running late and have notified others of my dilemma, I’m learning to believe God is at work wherever I am heading.”

“God asks us to learn from our failures and mistakes but not to live in our past pain. We take steps toward newness of life as we daily turn from the temptation of despair and put our hope in God.”

“Remember: God already knows what is in our hearts, so we are not informing the Lord of our cares and burdens when we seek God in prayer. We are laying our burdens upon the Lord so that we no longer need to carry them ourselves.”

“God always waits for us to return.”

“Jesus made a choice to save me from my bad choices.”

“The gift of his magnificent sacrifice and his offer of eternal life gives him pleasure.”

“Great God, help us to see opportunities in obstacles. Lead us by your Holy Spirit that we might act boldly like the apostle Paul. Amen.”

“Never let those cards stop coming. Everyone else forgets.”

Thanks for stopping by in 2014. The Kinesthetic Christian blog will continue with regular posts in the new year. It seems to be the ballast by which God balances the rest of what I do.

Here’s to a productive, God-centered, powerful 2015 for one and all!

Droopy but so not dead

I chose church over soccer this Sunday, and the show went on without me. Apparently, it was quite a physical affair, the Reston team persevering in the end by a 4-1 final score. My daughter Olivia scored one of the goals, so she says, and assisted on two of the others. But what she’s most proud of is defending the honor (and bodies) of her teammates. one in particular, whose playing style can be a bit annoying to the other team, I am sure. Apparently, annoyance turned physical and led to cautions and ejections.

My child sees her self as the “enforcer.” Really she is the defender. Any underdog, any where, is a cause for her concern. On this day that played out on the soccer field.

But I didn’t see it. What I saw instead was one droopy, white Mother’s Day flower which walked in with my sweaty but pleased daughter. IMG_5401 The flower is a tradition with the Bobcats. Hand it to their big-hearted coach who makes sure the mother’s are recognized on their special day – which is always a travel team’s soccer day because it falls on a Sunday mid-May. He arrives with a dozen and a half and the players distribute them to their moms in the stands before play begins.

Of course, I wasn’t in the stands. I was in the pews. So my flower waited to greet me some hours later, droopy but not yet dead. My daughter and I both laughed as I got out the vase and stuffed it in, hoping the neck would be support enough for its fragile stem. But no, it drooped sadly.

Have no fear, Olivia to the rescue. Toothpicks, tape, twist-ties and a bit of ingenuity later, she has the stem stabilized and the droop managed. She learned this, she says, from her paternal grandfather who was a renowned Bonsai expert. splinted flower

Next day, wouldn’t you know, the little lady is standing up almost straight. There, stabilized by a splint, wrapped with twist-ties, my flower beams happy Mother’s Day to me. And I beam back. It looks so like the newly repaired knees of the young women athletes I dearly love to train. Fragile to look at but so strong on the inside. A bit of special attention and they spring back to life. standing tall

 

This morning, my Mother’s Day flower greets me with yet another expression. Its pedals spread wide, so pleased to be beautiful, it is hugging me hello. Or maybe thank you. But probably, “Look out world, here I come!”

 

spread your petals

Never underestimate a rose. Or a child with a mind and heart to rescue.

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